CRST Chairman Candidates Q&A

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(Editors note: the following questions were prepared by the West River Eagle along with input from community members. Every effort was made to contact all 13 candidates however only 12 responded. The candidates are listed in alphabetical order according to their last name. Our apologies to Ryman LeBeau, his Q & A didn’t appear in print.)

Joseph Brings Plenty Sr.

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

Joseph Brings Plenty Sr. I work as a Law Enforcement Officer for the CRST Law Enforcement, I enjoy working and donating my time to youth in the area. I received my Associates NSU, near complete with B.S. in Criminal Justice. I have worked in schools, as a counselor and activity coordinator. I’m married to Joni Brings Plenty, Sons Joseph Brings Plenty Jr., Cole Brings Plenty, Seth Brings Plenty, Brett Brings Plenty daughter Belle Brings Plenty. I was raised in the Eagle Butte area, and I currently live in the Community of Cherry Creek with my family.  In the past I was honored in serving as the previous Chairman of the Tribe, term: December of 2006 to December of 2010.

What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

For Lakota leadership, it’s hard to speak about self-accomplishments. I feel that although we might not all serve on elected positions, we serve as role models for our communities and people. I do live a life of Sobriety, no drugs, no alcohol, no hurting people; I practice the Lakota traditions with respect to our ancestors in mind. I’ll share a few of my endeavors. During my term I worked well with outside departments, I was able to get support when needed, with the intake water line in the Missouri, the heating fuel issues with United States Government and also supplemental funding through the country of Venezuela, meeting on many levels with the U.S. Congress and Senate and other tribes here in the U.S. But, most importantly during these meetings and events, I kept my focus on the interest and needs of the tribal members of CRST.

What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

 The biggest issue I have seen during my four-year term is that I see the tribe, being out of compliance with the Constitution. The Constitution is policy that governs our own tribal government. For example, in the CRST Constitution, it states we have 13 precincts it tells how the voting in these areas are to be conducted but our current voting is within six districts not precincts. Another example, I see how the range units are allocated out to tribal members, but in the constitution it states up to 160 acres of land to be allocated nothing more. In our own constitution it says we are incompetent when it comes to the administration of our health services and education services. Tribes that have revised their constitution have become successful and much more respondent to its member’s, also this revision would help clean up most of the confusion.

What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

My opinion is that we strive to be a self-reliant nation. With this responsibility comes the reality and upkeep of our own courts, detention centers and law enforcement personal. The historical case, Crow Dog Ex Parte pushed the Major Crimes Act upon our nations, which federally stripped our ability within our own nation to oversee those crimes listed in the Act itself, since then Indian Nations have been on the defense when it comes to outside entities coming onto our lands and pressing their acts and laws upon us. We have a signed Treaty with the United States Government; this Treaty is deemed to be higher than federal law in itself. Now the people of this tribe have the ultimate power, in the ability to vote, if the tribal members of CRST want to give away what they are entitled to, then let them do so in a vote.

Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

The pipeline traffic is only the beginning to future outside interest in our resources and area. Many Indian Nations have been and will continuously deal with this issue. Do we have the ability to create strong laws in order to protect Indian people and Indian interest? Treaty and Government Law says we do. We are only as strong as our laws that govern us as a nation. I’ve seen the Iroquois Nation create their own passports and that is their rights, they are a sovereign nation, such as us. I’ve come to the understanding the tribe will face Fracking interests right here on our own lands, if this is done, it will cause great harm to the Mni waconi, our water supplies. If we can’t protect ourselves with our own law, I fear the worst in the safety and lives of our tribal members. Water is life.

Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

This question could be addressed through the constitutional revision process. Council Representatives duties are not defined in the constitution, which doesn’t protect them from dealing with personnel issues, although there is a resolution that does not allow personal issues on council floor, it has happened in the past. Council Representatives are Legislatures; the duties of administrating should be carried by the executive branch of our government which is the Chairman’s office. We would assume this, but those duties are not listed in the Constitution, those powers are given to the Chairman by resolution passed by Tribal Council, if council feels the need to strip the Chairman of those powers, it could happen in the raise of a hand and a vote to support.  I reiterate, Constitutional Revision would assist with departments and how they function, help with the employees on down the line to the members they are serving.

With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

Issues of funding cuts in Indian Country have existed since President Reagan’s term in office, with a huge cut of 75% during that time. Since then we have been cut yearly, and have to find other ways of supplementing our school dollars and assisting with health care issues, amongst other areas of need with in our tribe. One thing we have to keep mind, is that when we hear the term, new funding, I’ve learned that funding come from the Government isn’t technically new funding, its funding usually cut from another source of funding. We would have to meet with key personal in the White House to address these new issues we would be facing. This wouldn’t be an easy task but if the concern of the Tribe isn’t heard on a congressional and senate level, we may not be able to correct these new issues.

 Amos Cook

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

My name is Amos Cook. My Indian name is Tasunke Sapa, which means Black Horse in English. I am from the Takini Community on the west end of the reservation.

Past leadership roles I have held are working with the youth and the elderly. I ride every year with youth at risk, children of single parents, and take them up to the Big Horn to teach them culture, leadership, language, history, horseman ship and spirituality. I basically teach them how to deal with modern day problems. It works, I have been doing this for 6 years.

I am traditional person. I believe in cultural ways, seven values, Sundance and the sweat lodge.

I have worked a lot with the elderly, gaining knowledge from them and passing it on to the kids, and it helps me and the kids dealing with the problems of today’s society such drug abuse and alcohol abuse, neglect and peer pressure. I teach kids how to deal with negativity.

I have three beautiful boys, I have raised them with my wife to be role models for children who do not have both parents. They have compassion for children without fathers and mothers, and that is what I try to teach them.

What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

I believe in truth and honesty. I believe in unity. I am a very spiritual person, and I believe in spirituality. I am a full-blooded Lakota. I have a lot of ideas that I can put to use, but they have to be with the people, because the decisions are theirs.

I have ideas that we can use to create employment by developing natural resources using wind towers, green houses, solar energy and log homes.

The power is in the people. If I am elected as chairmen, I can’t and won’t move forward unless the people are together. I believe that the youth are important, as well as the elderly and everyone in between. Everybody in our tribe is important, and we all move forward together. We need to bring back unity.

What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

Unemployment is the number one issue here. We have 99 percent unemployment on this reservation. I want to bring employment by using natural resources and bringing that kind of business to the reservation. I need the people to help too. I can’t do this by myself. I need the people.

What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

I believe as tribal members, we can take care of our own. I always believed in the way our ancestors lived by. Some of their ways were strong, and kept our people strong, healthy and alive. I know we can create our own law enforcement, and we can protect and provide for our people.

Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

I think we have tried to stop that traffic, but they somehow keep going through, so I think we need to focus on where it is being sent to, but if we can’t stop it, we need to re-route it. We need to keep the pipeline, and its traffic off of our land because of the damage it could cause in the future.

Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

When it comes to that matter, we should follow protocol or procedure and act professionally to deal with the different situations. If we do not have something in place, then we need to develop something so that personal feelings are not brought to the work site. We need to act professionally, and both employers and employees need to keep their relationships professional, and not bring personal matters into the workplace.

With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

This will all go back to the natural resources that we use. It’s all about being sovereign. It’s all over the news and everywhere that we are sovereign, so I feel in my heart we should practice being sovereign. By using natural resources, we can generate funds, or be able to put funds back into a general fund for health care and education. I think the only way we are going to move forward is to make that change – to become a unified, sovereign nation.

Wayne L. Ducheneaux, II

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)
My name is Wayne L. Ducheneaux, II. I am the second youngest of 7 children born to Regina and the late Wayne Ducheneaux. I currently reside in Eagle Butte. My leadership roles have included running a Tribal Enterprise, the Cheyenne River Motel, serving for two years as the Administrative Officer of the Tribe, sitting as the Chairman and Vice-Chairman for several Council Committees, serving as a member of the Direct Service Tribes Advisory Council to the I.H.S. Director and I am currently the CRST Vice-Chairman.

What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

I feel my experience as a successful manager of a Tribal business, Administrative Officer, Council Representative and Vice-Chairman qualify me as being a good leader for the Tribe. I’ve been on every side of Tribal government and that helps me to see a complete picture on how we should operate. I feel the primary quality that makes me a good leader is having a good work ethic. I truly believe a Chairman’s day isn’t over at 5 pm and doesn’t begin at 8 am. You must be willing to be there early and stay late to set an example for the rest of the administration. Another quality I feel makes me a good leader is the ability to listen. No one person can be an expert at everything and being able to listen and take advice helps a person grow and make the best decisions possible.

What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

To list one issue as a priority is difficult but for the sake of providing an answer to the question I would say it’s still our water project. Not being able to provide the potable water needed for our Tribe to expand has stifled our growth physically, economically and causes the exacerbation of many other issues. No water has meant housing continues to be a problem and as we crowd into our current homes that pressures increase other issues. No water has meant the inability to build for new economic development. We are having to look at existing structures to bring in business because of the lack of water to develop new areas. As Chairman I will continue to push for the complete funding of the Mni Waste water project that will bring potable water to the entire Reservation so we can further address other issues facing the Tribe.

What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

I am not in favor of cross-deputization with city, county or state officials. We have the inherent sovereignty and responsibility to provide for a judicial system within our exterior boundaries that keep all residents of the Reservation safe. Rather than looking outside to other law enforcement to assist, I believe our Tribe has the capacity to expand our current jurisdiction. I would like to move to model our judicial system after other Tribal nations that would allow us the ability to enforce all law on the reservation and have our courts be the court of competent jurisdiction for members and non-members alike.

Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

Oil development is something we are going have to deal with for the foreseeable future. As a Tribal government we have stood against it as we feel the costs of development far outweigh any benefit gained. To ensure the proper safety for our Reservation we need to complete and implement the changes we are already working on to further develop our Traffic Code. These changes will give our Law Enforcement the further authority needed to ensure that public safety is upheld. It will also allow for us to hold the state and trucking companies accountable for routing improper cargo within our jurisdiction.

Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

As a Tribal Council absolutely not. Personnel matters are matters for the administration of the Tribe to deal with. As legislators if people are being treated unfairly the job is to shape policy to ensure the fair and equal treatment of all employees is a fundamental right. However as a candidate for Chairman it is the duty, according to policy, for the Chairman’s administration to handle such matters. If elected Chairman I would work to implement the policy set by the Council, work with them to change things that are not working and defend the rights of Tribal employees so that they can put forth their best effort doing the peoples work.

With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

The first thing we must do is continue with our alliances nationally to push back against these funding cuts. The federal government, nearly across the board is cutting base funding and moving toward competitive grant funding for Indian related programs. This is a complete 180 from their obligation to the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe through our treaty rights. If elected I will work to educate and inform Congress on these obligations and help to show them that increasing base funding to Indian programs is the only way to fulfill these obligations. We must use comprehensive and strategic planning to shape the minds of the Congress and reverse this damaging path we heading down now.

Ronald Eagle Chasing

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

Ronald Eagle Chasing, Mni Koju, I come from the Chief Hump and Crazy Horse Clan. I live in Eagle Butte.

What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

I’m a Vietnam Veteran.

What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

 People have the power, not the council.

What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

Negotiate

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

We need to negotiate with Washington D.C.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

No. No more nepotism. Let those in charge do their jobs.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

Changes need to be made.

 Thomas Ray Eagle Staff

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

I am Thomas Ray Eagle Staff (My Lala named me “Wanbli Wapaha”). I am married to Etheleen (Eddie) Jewett and together, we have 6 sons, 2 daughters, and 12 grandchildren. We live East of Whitehorse and thoroughly enjoy the “country” or rural living; smell of grass, sage, clover, wildlife, etc. Past leadership roles include being the Chairman and Co-chairman of a National planning committee for Youth Regional Treatment Centers. This committee developed an ‘outcome measuring program’ that was designed to illustrate progress and/or the success of individuals in alcohol and substance abuse treatment. Our Committee received a National Achievement Award from HHS-IHS and SAMHSA for the development of this program and I received an individual award for leadership.

What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

One of the primary duties of the Chairman is to manage the Real Property and Financial and Human resources for the Tribe; I have over 30-years of work experience in management and administration. This includes managing two different urban non-profit Indian Organizations, administrative experience from employment with the CRST and a 28-year career with Indian Health Service that included health facilities planning and being the administrator for two youth regional treatment centers. During my IHS career I utilized data and data analysis to aid with planning and management. These same strategic planning methodologies could be applied to Tribal Programs to enhance their services and/or performances and provide data to measure, illustrate, and adjust services as data indicates. Assess and make data driven decisions to implement change.

 What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

The unemployment rate (47% Tribal Ventures Report); this issue affects the quality of life for members, deters progress, and revenue generating opportunities for small businesses and the Tribe. As the new Chairman, I would assess the Tribe’s economic development plan, encourage small business development through the partnerships with Tribal Ventures and Four Bands, and encourage the Tribe’s planning department to seek business perspectives with enterprises that would employ large numbers of employees.

 What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

I do not support cross-deputizing State or County law enforcement officers as it would jeopardize the Tribe’s Sovereignty. The Tribal/BIA Police Officers are able respond to assist the State or County Officers with law enforcement situations involving Tribal members.

I would favor cross-deputizing “our” Tribal/BIA Police Officers. This action would make their job easier to enforce the applicable set of laws and be more responsive to all law enforcement issues. Especially, when the safety of our Tribal members is in question as in a domestic abuse/violence situation; a lot of “wait-time” is expended waiting for the appropriate law enforcement officer to arrive to address the Non-Indian violator.

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

Definitely. There is too much ambiguity in the Tribal Council Resolution intended to assist the Tribal/BIA Police Officers.

A Tribal Traffic Code regulating truck traffic in the same manner as the Department of Transportation could also be a possible revenue source to hire more law enforcement officers. A well developed code would require Tribal Permits to cross the Reservation (similar to TERO), provide authority to regulate weight limits, check log books, inspect loads, provide for portable scales to monitor and prevent weight limit abuses, etc.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

The Tribe should allow the human resource management plan and/or the personnel policy and procedures work for them. The Tribe identifies a financial and human resource management plan as part of each contract and grant application the Tribe manages. These plans/policies and procedures need to be adhered to for the continuation of these funding streams and services. Anytime these plans and/or policies and procedures are not followed; questioned or disallowed costs are identified during the audits of these grants and contracts. Such findings could be detrimental to any organization as the funding source asks for compensation for the disallowed costs or decreases future funding as a result.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

I would simply work with each entity and “Assess and adjust.” Two key questions would be; “are we optimizing each and every reimbursement opportunity for services provided?” And, have we sought accreditation and/or maintained accreditation for reimbursement purposes?”

Despite the ‘wolf cries’ of certain U.S. Senators and Congressmen, Medicare/Medicaid will always be available as a means to supplement healthcare operations. Maximizing reimbursement opportunities in healthcare has always been a key factor in determining the feasibility of healthcare. Look at how many healthcare clinics there are in Eagle Butte.

For education, the student reimbursement rate needs to be assessed and if needed, work toward adjusting rates to similar levels of the Department of Defense Education System and/or Impact Aid reimbursement levels.

Assess your data and adjust. Then lobby Congress as needed.

 Harold Frazier

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

My name is Harold Frazier, I live in White Horse SD with my family girlfriend Annette, daughter Mariah, sons Jake and Noah and grandson Dylan. I was Chairman of CRST in 2002-2006, Tribal Councilman 1998-2002 and Chairman of the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen Assoc. Area and Vice-President of NCAI.

 What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

BS Degree in Business Administration

AA degree in General Business and AAS in Ag Business

Past Chairman and Administrator of CRST. Field Supervisor for Cheyenne River Gas & CATV

I live and practice our Traditional Ways. Understand well and speak a little of our Lakota language.

 What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

There are many issues that affect our people. One of them is high unemployment. I would encourage education for our people. Develop a work program utilizing JTAC to build a work force and bring in industry so our people can have jobs and work.

 What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

I believe strongly in Law & Order but we need to be cautious in entering in any agreement with outside jurisdictions so we do not give any of our sovereignty and jurisdiction.

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

Yes, we do need to have a strong Traffic Code to address the traffic, particularly dealing with heavy trucks. We need scales set up so we could weigh and take measures to stop these overweight trucks from ruining our roads.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

NO, elected officials shouldn’t be involved with personnel matters. Only the Administration should be involved.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

I would lobby Congress for more funding and to stop the proposed cuts. I have done this before during my last term in office and was quite successful.

 William Carl High Bear Sr.

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

William Carl High Bear Sr. I Live in Dupree. Spouse Lindell High Bear. I have five children.

 What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

I have some education. Held several positions with tribe. I’m very consistent in working and serving my family. I would do the same for the CRST.

 What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

Our youth and elders are being left out of in-town opportunities.

 What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

None what so ever, it would be up to the people of CRST.

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

It would take a more developed traffic code by CRST.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

No, leave it up to Human Resources and the policy group to handle personnel issues.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

Take actions or respond to government officials to not cut our Health and Education. These areas are much needed for our people.

 Bryce In The Woods

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

Le Wakinyan Cikala Lakol caje bluha yelo. Ate na Ina mitawa Lakota woglakapi na waniyetu ota Unci/Ina Maka akan ni pelo. I am Bryce In The Woods my Lakota name is Wakinyan Ciikala. My parents are Jobe and Ellen In The Woods who speak our Lakota language and have lived on our Grandmother/Mother Earth for many winters. My brothers are Bernard, Burton, Bentley, Barney, Byron and my sisters Beverly, Bessie, Bernita, and Belinda. I have three siblings that passed away Barbara, Bobby and Blaine. My significant other and life partner Candace Lee has been by my side for 13 years. I live in the community of Dupree and in the house where my Father passed into the spirit world. I was on the city council of Dupree and once made a recommendation on flagpoles. I have been the Recording Secretary since 1999 of the Naca Okolakiciye name change in 2001 to the Lakota Elders Council, National Vice-Commander of the National American Indian Veterans, Inc, CRST Wolakota and Veterans Affairs Chairman for eight years, Black Hills Advisory Board 2002-2005, No Child Left Behind Advisory Board 2010, Wakpa Sica Judicial Committee, United Native Nations member, Tetonwan Oyate Treaty Council and Black Hills Treaty Council since 1996, two-term CRST District 1 Council Representative, District 1 Community Development Cooperative President, US Army veteran.

 What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

The experiences I have as a Treaty Council Representative and a two-term Tribal Council Representative. I have some college, was a certified Alcohol/Drug counselor, currently a Community Health Representative, and past military service. I gained experience working with the Youth with the Healthy Nations program and the Elders through the Lakota Elders Council. I have worked with professionals; Tribal and US elected officials and experienced Indigenous peoples throughout this journey. I have done Hanbleciya and Wiwangya Wacipi Rites with the Canumpa that I gained much universal knowledge through our Creator. This has sustained our Lakota People through good times and times of tribulations. I have my legislative accomplishments on Facebook for 2000-2004 check it out. Briefly our People invested in me and I feel I owe an obligation to give my best for the People. My goal is to end poverty on this reservation.

 What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

It is one of a socio-economic nature. The statistics that even the White House puts out on poverty, suicide, violence, it is negativity against our People. I have heard the White House report at the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in March 2012. The CRST and the Peta/Oceti Sakowin have a vast resource that we have been unable to tap into to address our economy. WE get the resources that our rightfully ours we can start the process in changing are social structure with jobs, food on the table, good winter outfits and shelter from harsh elements. I have been working on addressing poverty and have two solid plans that our PEOPLE need to review. It will be the PEOPLE that will change our situation on poverty not elected officials.

 What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

I would oppose cross-deputization with the state unless our PEOPLE confirm this would be what they want or desire. The Chairman’s position is as an Eyapaha for the people and must protect the sovereignty and jurisdiction of the PEOPLE. The People are the true sovereignty bearers. A question to the PEOPLE protect which sovereignty and jurisdiction the CRST or the Peta/Oceti Sakowin?

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

There is a draft traffic code that an ex-police officer brought in and I don’t know the status of this proposed legislation. I believe we must have a forward-looking traffic code now to protect our environment and most importantly our people. This again is a sovereignty and jurisdiction issue. The CRST can weigh and fine these heavy hauls as one option instead of them passing by uncontested. The TransCanada representatives with State Department officials present never answered the question on “How TransCanada will deal with earthquakes?”I was on the conference call in 2012 this is an important question that needs to be answered.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

If the question is should elected officials micro-manage? No they shouldn’t there is a Code of Ethics that was passed in 2005. Elected Officials should be developing policy and laws to strengthen the services provided to our people and protecting our sovereignty and jurisdiction. The Chairman does have some delegated authorities through a 1978 resolution, the CRST Constitution and by-laws and tribal law, specifically the CRST Personnel Policy and Procedure Manual.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

The key is for a united front to pursue the changing funding cycles. A Great Plains front of united elected officials and our People that are working in these fields. We get a lot of lip service from federal officials but to be effective is to get to the right people the President, the Office of Management and Budget and congressional appropriation committee Chairs and their key staff. We have to know our History because we are the Creditors not the Debtors. Briefly I am completing this at the 11th hour before press. Unity amongst ourselves is the KEY!

 Manny C. Iron Hawk

Background (family: community you live in: past leadership roles)

My name is Manny C. Iron Hawk, Si Thanka/Maspegnaka Thiospaye, my immediate family consists of Hasani Renee Iron Hawk, Chunksi, Michon and Claudia. We reside in Frazier/Red Scaffold west side of Wakpa Waste (Cheyenne River). I have been in Education for 25 plus years, started as a Bus driver/custodian, paraprofessional to obtaining a Master’s degree in administration. My leadership roles consist of: being a spokesperson for my thiospaye, educational leadership role in PK-12 school, District 2 chairperson at various times, served on the Sioux YMCA board, CRST Police Commission, Little Bighorn advisory board, served as a Takini school board member, CRST Pte Hcaka board, CRST Housing Authority board, CRST Telephone Authority board, Farm Service Agency Board member for Ziebach County, and on the Tri-Community Development board.

 What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for CRST?

My qualifications include completing a Master’s degree, Effective communication is the “KEY” including good listening skills, leadership is power WITH people, Model the way, “Come, Follow Me”, Inspire a shared Vision in areas of need, example Poverty and Unemployment. Challenge the Process of doing right than being right. Encourage others to Act assist and create conditions that release their human potential. Lastly, Encourage the Heart with positive messages. Following Lakota Values/Virtues of bravery, fortitude, generosity and holding the people in your heart.

 What do you think is the number one issue the CRST faces and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

There are many issues on Cheyenne River infrastructure (roads), unemployment, poverty, education, lack of created jobs, inflation on the reservation, sovereignty, but the main issue I would address is education. We need to remap our education system to a world-class education system where our students can compete globally anywhere.

 What is your stance on cross deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

I believe it can work providing agreements are followed through on arrests made. The agreements need to be specific and a plan in place for any situation.

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

Yes, on top of our issue challenges, we need a strong code that will deter the traffic and level fines when violated.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

No, that is why we have a grievance policy procedure and the tribal courts. If it doesn’t work we need to replace it with one that will work.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

If we are a true sovereign nation and a “Treaty Tribe” we deserve the best in health care and education. I believe upholding our treaty rights is the key, and in administrating funds we need to stay within our budget limitations. Lobbying is a must, in Washington, DC with senators and congressional officials. I would do my utmost with other tribal leaders to lobby for continued improved health care and educational funding a top priority.

 Lanny W. LaPlante, Jr.

Name and background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

Lanny W. LaPlante, Jr. I was born in Eagle Butte, in 1971. Mother, Irma LaPlante, retired CEB Kindergarten Teacher. Father, Lanny LaPlante, Sr. former CRST tribal councilman/chairman. Graduate of Takini High School, 1990. Enlisted in US Marine Corp 1992, honorably discharged in 2006.2007-2008 Residential/Commercial construction, Boston,MA.

2009-2010 CRST Police Officer. 2010-present Advisor to US Government. 2007-present Airport Construction. 2013 University of Massachusetts at Boston, student.

 What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

My qualifications for leadership stem from my 14 years of experience as a Marine/Force Reconnaissance Marine. I have had the lives of not only Marines, but also US Government personal entrusted to my care. In the private sector I am an advisor to the, US Government in high threat areas. I own my own company and have built airports from San Diego CA to Orlando FL. I have construction knowledge with state and Federal Government/FAA. Integrity and compassion for my people. I believe in transparency in government and balance of power. I believe in the civil rights of tribal members and the responsibility of those elected to respond to the issues of the people by whom they are elected.

 What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?.

Corruption. And the lack of transparency in our government, For example, the Veterans’ building in the No Heart Community was never completed. For the excavation cost alone, $250,000 was paid from the funds gifted Work that should have cost $15,000. The end result was the building which was meant to honor our veterans, many of which, who were still fighting on foreign soil, was never completed.

Buffalo Program, 3 million dollars is unaccounted for, instead of demanding for accountability our council spent millions more covering up the mismanagement, no questions asked. I plan to audit all programs and to give quarterly reports to the public.

 What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

In no way do I support the idea of cross deputization. Our reservation is on trust land and protected by federal government laws. Tribal sovereignty is of the utmost importance. Updating our codes will assist our leaders in strengthening courts and tribal police officers for the future. Our police officers will get the best training and resources to do their job safely. As a community, we need to support our tribal officers. We shall establish CRST as the forerunner for all police departments to emulate.

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

Yes, I believe the issue is sovereignty. We as a tribe, have the right, to protect and preserve our sovereign nation. As US citizens, we have the right, under the constitution to peacefully assemble and protest any and all intrusion that undermines the safety and well being of our lands and or people. Updating our tribal constitution, by the people to strengthen all aspects of our sovereignty, including our right to protect our environment is essential to the health and future of our nation.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

No, this has been a common trend among our people. It has hurt us as a tribe, We have tribal members who do not have qualifications, experience or training running programs. This has had a crippling affect on our tribe and its’ ability to evolve. We as a tribe need to take family politics out of our work environment and operate with true professionalism as a people.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

Improving our tribal economy is the only solution to maintaining our sovereignty, language, culture and improving our educational goals. We are the first educators of our children, preparing them to compete in a global economy requires us to instill all the unique strengths that come from our culture and history. Through education and cultural awareness, we as a people, must adapt healthier lifestyle. Through our grass roots economic plan, raising food with integrity, buying local and becoming more self sustaining we can better manage our preventable health issues, reducing the demand on Federal funds.

Ryman LeBeau

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

My name is Ryman LeBeau. My wife Lesli and are the parents of four children three boys and one girl.

I have had various leadership roles in the past. From my past leadership roles, I am proud of being promoted to “Project Coordinator” AI Program, when I worked for Native American Fish & Wildlife Society. Also, in December 2008 being elected to Council and Reelected in 2012 to Council by District 5.

 What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

My qualifications and qualities for a good leader are as follows:

December 2003 graduated from Haskell Indian Nations University

January 2004 hired as a Biologist for the Native American Fish & Wildlife Society

July 2006 Promoted to “Project Coordinator” A.I. Program for the Native American Fish & Wildlife Society

December 2012 Re-Elected to Tribal Council from District 5

 What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

The number one issue for the Tribe is drinking water for all the citizens. Since I’ve been on Tribal Council we all have been working on getting drinking water to all the communities throughout the rez. With the groundbreaking of the new water line, we are halfway in accomplishing this goal. We need to continue to lobby for funds and continue to work with our partners at the DC level, USDA, BIA, IHS and private sector. Water is life. With drinking water available throughout the rez would mean new housing and new businesses – growth.

 What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

We need to always protect the sovereign rights of our tribe and the sovereign rights of our citizens before any cross deputation.

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

Yes it does warrant more developed traffic code. Also in the Environment committee, which I chair, we are working to update and upgrade our Environmental protection laws against illegal spilling, down stream.pollution and other ways to protect our lands.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

No. Elected officials have a role and should respect the Tribes separation of Administration and Legislation.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

We need to educate Congress not only the SD Senators and Congresswoman but all the key players in Congress, on their trust responsibility that they have to fully fund Health and Education for our Tribe.

Robert “Bob” Walters

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

Mitakuyapi, Tatanka Luta miye yelo. My name is Robert Walters but most people know me as Bob. I am the son of the late Joe Walters and Betty Walters and the grandson of Willard H and Amy (Arpan) Walters. I grew up at Promise and attended School at White Horse, Promise and Graduated from Timber Lake High School. I attended Lake Area Vo Tech and graduated with my degree in Carpentry. I married Kathy in 1984; we have 3 children Brice, Willard and Connie Jo they have all graduated from C-EB. We have also been blessed with one granddaughter Wokini Mae.

I have worked at various places through the years from cutting meat at Butlers Jack and Jill, driving the CRST Propane truck and becoming an Inspector for Housing Authority. I left Housing 12 years ago when I was first elected to Tribal Council and have had the honor to serve the people. During my time on council I have served as Vice Chairman and have been on many committees including the Missouri River Implementation Recovery Committee.

 What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

I believe first of all that I am honest and fair, I understand that there are always two sides to every situation and I believe that both sides be known before decisions are made. I am strong; I stand my ground when fighting for our water other important issues and believe that strength could be used to Lobby at the State and Federal Governments as your Chairman. While on Tribal Council I held the position of Vice Chairman, I know the people and the structure and functions of the Tribal departments and businesses, there wouldn’t be a learning period we the Tribal Council and Administration could go straight to work for the people of Cheyenne River.

 What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

There are several issues from health care to housing. But I feel that the number one issue is our water issue because without water there is no life. The oil pipe line is right up there too, because it threatens our water and the land.

 What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

Absolutely NOT!!!

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

Our Council has already taken action by resolution not allowing the Oil pipeline trucks to come through the reservation. To me that is the stand of the Tribal government, therefore it should be respected by the outside entities.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

No, I do not believe that they should involve themselves. Although I do believe we should listen to the employee and direct them to follow protocol and as elected officials we should make sure that the employees rights are respected and that they are treated fairly.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

I have and always will remind IHS and the powers that be that Health Care and Education are Treaty Rights and that they cannot take them away from us.