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CRST Tribal Council Candidates Q&A

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Here are the responses we received back from CRST council candidates.

District 1

Bernita In The Woods

Introduction statement (age, family, background, leadership experience) 

- I am 52 years old, and 2nd youngest of 14 (5 sisters/8 brothers).

- Raised in Dupree almost all my life in which I currently reside.

 – 4 children: Jarrod (Logan) Anderson, Jacob (Kracy) Anderson, Jerico Anderson, and Tanner Dupris. 11 grandchildren.

 – Parents are (the late) Jobe and Ellen (Condon) In The Woods.

 – Associate Degree from Northern State University in 2001/Bachelor Degree from Black Hills State University in 2008.

 – Employed with CRST Health Department for 24 years.

 – Recipient of the Aberdeen Area Director’s Award for Outstanding Tribal Health Administrator in 2010.

 – Currently Case manager for the CRST Four Bands Healing Center.

 – Secretary for Dupree Lakota Community Committee.

There are a number of important issues facing the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, what issues do you think are priority and if elected how do you plan to address those issues?   

As I travelled to the District 1 communities, concerns were heard regarding housing, healthcare, transportation, employment, safety, roads, and just basic needs for existence. People feel forgotten.

Strategic planning has proven to aid in improvement as well as utilizing the expertise of programs, boards, and committees in all these areas.

 – Job creation of course through grants and TECA but restructuring financially will move us towards self-sufficiency. Improving ability in application completion aids in placement/hiring. Support to improve and enhance personnel and job training programs.

 – Educated experienced members are needed here. Provide job security with improved retirement and benefit packages.

 – Using present resources in developing strategic plans can aid in addressing this crisis. Water is key!

 – Where is our Disaster Plans?! History of severe weather should have expedited a complete and updated plan. Current epidemics can devastate our population. The Tribe has to take the lead in getting this done.

 – We underutilize our resources. We must develop unique innovations. Water is key! Without it we can’t grow or invest.

 – Relations are strained with our healthcare entities. Agreements and understandings to create continuity of care as well as a combined community approach can lead to a better understanding of education, prevention, and intervention to decrease mortality and morbidity. Placing ownership by our people creates a better quality of life. Our people no longer need to remain in a state of dependency.

 – Be at the table with federal agency representatives from Departments of Agriculture, Health and Human Services, Justice, Treasury and Interior to be aware of detailed information about funding opportunities and also work with successful tribes and learn from one another.

 – Our reservation is comprised of land with complex jurisdiction issues, underfunding and poor quality road conditions due to lack of funding. When negotiating we must ensure our sovereignty is not jeopardized and to enter into agreements with proper legal advice. In protecting our sovereignty we need a staff of attorneys who will be watchful and keep representatives on track and restrained from violating our tribal laws, constitution and cease interference with judicial matters.

Tribal council collectively at times has been described as dysfunctional and self-serving. If elected what will you do to help change public perception of how the people perceive their elected officials?

I want to bring the people’s agenda to the chambers and conduct myself ethically and will hold other representatives accountable as well.

 – Re-establishing trust and respect. Respect restores the integrity of our name. I will be consistent in working with Tribal Council to implement support to our programs and entities. Instead of burdening directors and programs with micromanaging behavior, I will remain diligent with Tribal Council to ensure rights are not violated and due process is afforded. Micromanagement stops progress and hinders growth.

 – We must hold ourselves to a higher standard to ensure we do not violate our Constitution or the individual rights of our people. Tribal Council has an overall obligation to be accountable to the people. Community reports must be mandatory. 

Do you feel it’s a fair practice for tribal council representatives to be paid if the tribal council doesn’t meet because of a lack of a quorum?    Do you think that changes need to be made to how and when tribal council members are compensated?

No, it isn’t fair. Tribal Council hinders progress when monthly agendas are not addressed which in turn hurts the future of our children and tribe as a whole. When Tribal Council stops working for the people to ensure the quality of life is adequate then our people remain in a state of dependency on the tribe and the goal of self-sufficiency is no longer a reality.

Yes, changes need to be made. Of course extenuating circumstances of illness and loss of life are understandable for an absence. However, we are hired by the people to do a job. We expect employees to report to work then Tribal Council must be held to that same expectation. We are in a disadvantaged state that is being neglected due to no quorums. Plans can be put on the table for review of working practices that have proven effective in Indian Country.

District 4

Kevin C. Keckler

Introduction statement (age, family, background, leadership experience) 

My name is Kevin C. Keckler and I am 52 years old. I am married to Marla and have three grown children: Arlyn, Lexi, and Nolan. I have three granddaughters: Lauryn (9), Suni (5), and Rowie (3). My parents are Bob and Arliss Keckler and I have three brothers: Justin, Dean, and Jess as well as ten nieces and nephews and two great nephews and one great niece. I have served two terms as a District #4 Council Representative (2002-2010) and one term as Tribal Chairman (2010-present).

 There are a number of important issues facing the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, what issues do you think are priority and if elected how do you plan to address those issues?   

The important issues that I believe are a priority are as follows in no particular order of importance: Water – The Tribe and Mni Waste’ are in the middle of a $72 million upgrade to get a sufficient supply of water to Eagle Butte. Without a sufficient supply of water, many other important issues cannot be addressed (i.e., housing, schools, tribal office, economic development, etc.), therefore, the water line is of utmost importance and I will continue to support the project. Keystone XL Pipeline – The Tribe needs to continue to vehemently oppose the construction of the oil pipeline that is going to be constructed on our treaty lands and just west of the current Reservation boundary because we do not need our people to be exposed to the ill side effects (i.e., crime, transportation, housing, etc.) of oil projects as well as the contamination of our valuable water supply. Elderly Village Operational Funding – the Tribe needs to modify and pass legislation through the TECA Ordinance #74 to ensure that operations of the elderly village is continual and sufficient each and every year to allow Tribal member elders to have a beautiful place to live. Other important issues are: BIE funding of education, Tribal education scholarships, additional housing, and continued increased funding of social programs to assist our membership as they need assistance but because of space limitations I cannot expand upon.

Tribal council collectively at times has been described as dysfunctional and self-serving. If elected what will you do to help change public perception of how the people perceive their elected officials?

If elected, I will attend whatever committee/commission meetings I choose to be on as well as Tribal Council each and every month and past attendance records will verify my attendance at meetings and council sessions. In addition, I have personally experienced the issue of Tribal Council Representatives going over and above their legislative duties and delving into administrative and judicial issues which exudes the public perception of dysfunction when valuable council session time is spent debating/discussing issues which should not be on council floor. As a result, I will perform only legislative functions as defined in the Tribal constitution and not involve myself in activities or functions of the administration and judicial branches. I will also support the administration, Tribal departments, and allow the employees to complete their jobs and serve the people.

Do you feel it’s a fair practice for tribal council representatives to be paid if the tribal council doesn’t meet because of a lack of a quorum?    Do you think that changes need to be made to how and when tribal council members are compensated? 

No. Yes, changes need to be made. In the early 2000’s, there was a resolution passed and was later rescinded that placed dollar values on attendance at Tribal Council sessions and committee/commission meetings. A resolution similar to the previous resolution needs to be considered and passed to address attendance issues if attendance does not improve. My thought on the whole issue is that the Tribal Council Representatives are grown adults and should perform the duties that he/she is elected to do.

Merrie Miller

Introduction statement: My name is Merrie Miller and I am running for the District 4 Tribal Council Representative position. I am 51 years old. I am married to Kevin White Bull and I have three children. Oryn, Keith and Rebecca White Bull.   I coached dance teams for C-EB School and Standing Rock School as well as community members for about 19 years. I have worked with over 120 girls ranging in ages form 3 years of age to 18.   I have an Associate of Arts Degree in Elementary Education, Bachelor Degree in Elementary Education. I have served on the Tribal Council for two-four year terms. During my terms I was Co-Chairman-National Negotiated Rulemaking Committee for School Construction, Chairman-Judiciary Committee, Vice-Chairman-Judiciary Committee, Chairman-Election Board, Chairman-Education Committee, Vice-Chairman Education Committee, and Vice-Chairman of the Health Committee.

There are a number of important issues facing the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, what issues do you think are priority and if elected how do you plan those issues?

All issues are important to the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe and should all be a priority.   I sit on over thirteen committees. It is hard to focus on one issue when you have other meetings you have to be at which is just as important. Sometimes the meetings are stacked and you have to choose which meeting you are going to attend and then you are counted absent for one or the other meetings and then you have missed an important vote on an important issue. If elected, I would push to limit the committees a council representative could serve on. There are fifteen council representatives who could each serve on three or four committees in order to meet more than just once a month to address all important issues. More issues would be able to be addressed and we would not be pulled from one meeting to the next.

Tribal Council collectively at times has been described as dysfunctional and self-serving. If elected what will you do to help change public perception of how the people perceive their elected officials?

I have learned in my last term to find out what others perceive about me by asking for feedback from the people and spend some time on self-reflection. I try to be open to constructive criticism as this helps with understanding my own strengths and weaknesses.  I believe we need to let our actions match our words every single time. As leaders we need to motivate and act with conviction. We need to continually communicate the reasons behind the decisions we make. We need to follow- through on our actions. As a leader we need to be aware of the effect we have on others.  When we make a decision that is not popular, we need to be visible and accessible to the people. Give explanations and answer questions for the people. I would like to state that I have found in my two terms of service that you have to work together. You have to get along. Each council representative is unique and we each are elected with different knowledge, talents and abilities. Working together, I believe we can accomplish anything.

Do you feel it’s a fair practice for tribal council representatives to be paid if the tribal council doesn’t meet because of a lack of a quorum? Do you think that changes need to be made to how and when tribal council members are compensated? 

The CRST Constitution states that you will be paid for services rendered. How can you render a service when you show up for council but there is no quorum? At the same time, Council Representatives are responsible for taking care of their families and providing for them. They have bills like everyone else which has to be paid in a timely manner or else they are taken to court. I believe we should be compensated monthly for services rendered for working in committee meetings as well as attending Tribal Council. We spend anywhere from three to 8 hours a day on one committee meeting. That being said, I work for the people. Each council representative is elected by the voters in their district. Let them decide. I believe changes need to be made as to how and when tribal council members are compensated. I believe the way to do this is by amending the CRST constitution.

District 5

Robin LeBeau

Introduction statement (age, family, background, leadership experience)  

My Name is Robin L. LeBeau Tatanka Agli Win, I am 38 years old. I have one 12 year old son, 2 nephews and my uncle who reside with me. My family is the late Archie LeBeau and Norma Mills, my father is Greg LeBeau and my parents are Rhea Turning Heart and Jeff Yearick. My great grandparents were Dennis and Rosalie Dog Eagle, and Ramona Hill Dog Eagle.My leadership experience comes from you the people who have allowed me serve you for the past 4 years, Lila wopila tanka.

There are a number of important issues facing the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, what issues do you think are priority and if elected how do you plan to address those issues?  

With multi tasking a different number of issues on a daily basis, the first thing I see is to make a priority list and go 110% on those issues facing our Tribe, and don’t stop tell we accomplish something. The first thing is creating a market for economic development here on the reservation, and creating a job force of more than 2 or 3 jobs here and there.. We have to be able to market or Tribe, for ex: showing the outside world we have the skills to accomplish many things, or people our brilliant and are ready to be given a chance.

It’s our duty also to help combat the unprecedented amount of drug activity that is occurring now. Again, investing time to continue to work on strengthening laws, establishing a inpatient treatment center, here, and building the resources to help the courts, law enforcement, and Four Bands Healing center to help us, help them combat the issue. There are many other issues that face our Tribe, that we need to continue to work to see completion, and the need to continue to defend..

Tribal council collectively at times has been described as dysfunctional and self serving. If elected what will you do to help change public perception of how the people perceive their elected officials? 

We need to police ourselves but I am also counting on the people to put “team player’s” on the team. I believe we are ethically bound to create more laws and policy’s to govern ourselves, for ex: Council passed a motion that was brought by my district to create a fines and forfeitures for continued tardiness, absenteeism and we need legal to finalize and bring back, and make it a reality.

We also need to have the ethics resolution actually inforced and establish the commission, instead of having “council” again being the jury and judge against there very own..

The impeachment procedures also need to be passed.

The bottom line is we need the people to empower themselves to help enforce and make the change as well, go through with a ethics violation, go through with a recall, and make an impeachment happen, if all facts and truths or there, then I would support, we have tried but cannot get the support of council to police themselves.

Do you feel it’s a fair practice for tribal council representatives to be paid if the tribal council doesn’t meet because of a lack of a quorum?   

Is it fair?  no due to the constitution stating service rendered, but is it fair for the people to hold those who show up on time, attend every meeting, go to there district meeting and represent them during council to be held accountable for the others who choose to for whatever reason, to not be there?

Do you think that changes need to be made to how and when tribal council members are compensated?

Yes, right now there is really no established system of how to get rendered your service except a few council action’s stating when. The executive branch is actually paid on a employee timesheet, they work there 80 hours, accrue sick and annual leave, they get employee insurance, and get paid every 2 weeks.They also get an hourly wage. A rep makes a salaried base rate of pay, no insurance, nothing for retirement, and you pay taxes either only on the federal being taken out or a 1099..

So, a formal procedure identified by the people, would be awesome. The people have tried it for council in forms of salary cuts, and I have supported those efforts.

Robert Chasing Hawk, Sr.

Introduction statement (age, family, background, leadership experience) 

Robert Chasing Hawk, Sr., 69, I have 6 children, 13 grandchildren. Graduated from high school, attended Business College, honorably discharged from U.S. Army, Vietnam veteran 1967-1968, 18 years of experience as elected official

There are a number of important issues facing the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, what issues do you think are priority and if elected how do you plan to address those issues?

 Redistricting is my number one priority, because the last redistricting was illegally done without people’s input. Next priority, illegal sales tax collection by the city of Eagle Butte, because they essentially tax the whole reservation. 3rd priority, we need to fight illegal drugs like meth as a Sovereign Nation, its destroying our Nation. We need jobs, jobs jobs.

 Tribal council collectively at times has been described as dysfunctional and self serving. If elected what will you do to help change public perception of how the people perceive their elected officials?

I will draft and introduce the resolutions to improve the procedures of the council which can be referendum if the tribal council failed to approve the resolutions, examples; pay cut, constitutional duties for council reps, establish an Ethic Commission, elected officials can be sued individually pursuant to Indian Civil Rights Act, etc.

 Do you feel it’s a fair practice for tribal council representatives to be paid if the tribal council doesn’t meet because of a lack of a quorum?   Do you think that changes need to be made to how and when tribal council members are compensated?

Apparently, elected officials put themselves above the law and disregard their Oath of Office and do crazy things, but with written policies approve by the districts councils regulating the procedures of the council to reiterate “Services must be actually rendered” and hopefully, this will not happen again. Also, there should be no more per diem advances and council representatives’ pay cut and travel cut by 75%, we need to stay home and work as a team to start fighting poverty.

Raymond Uses The Knife Jr.

Introduction statement (age, family, background, leadership experience)

Hello my name is Raymond Uses The Knife Jr. 58 years young, candidate for District 5. The election is Next Tuesday Nov. 4th. It’s very important that we vote.

I am a member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. Fluent Lakota Speaker with good Proficiency in the English Language. I lived in the district now for a number of years. My Maternal Great Grand Parents are Amos and Iron Cedar Woman Clown, both buried along the southern banks of the Moreau River in Thunder Butte South Dakota. My Paternal Grand Parents William Uses The Knife and Elizabeth Eagle Chasing both buried near Cherry Creek South Dakota. My Parents are Raymond Uses The Knife Sr (deceased) and my Mother Ethel Uses The Knife living at the Golden Age living Center in Rapid City South Dakota. I grew up on my family ranch near Thunder Butte South Dakota.

(Experience) I have been on the Tribal Council for over 22 years. In 1990 I was elected a junior council rep from District one. In District one I was re-elected for 4 consecutive terms. Elected in District 5 in 2008-2012. I have been on many of the various Council Committees. I was elected Vice Chairman of the Tribe from 2003 to 2006. I am looking forward to working with the People and the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe if elected.

There are a number of important issues facing the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, what issues do you think are priority and if elected how do you plan to address those issues?

Cultural Identity is one of the most important issues facing many Tribes. I believe we need to retain and enhance our knowledge in Culture, Language and our Spirituality. Our Children must identify with our way of life. Our Elders must teach. There are so many issues and debate as to our existence as the Lakota Nation. The Sioux Nation was once a force to be reckoned with. We still are a Power Nation if we are United. Collectively we must be strong in Promoting our Identity. Our Ancestors have fought and died for our way of life. We must not let them down.

Health, Education, Social Welfare, Infrastructure development, are my Priorities while serving on the various committees of Council.

Tribal council collectively at times has been described as dysfunctional and self serving. If elected what will you do to help change public perception of how the people perceive their elected officials?

The simple answer is to elect People who lead by example. I have been working our family business as ranchers since I was 5 years. I’ve experienced the hard labor in the hot sun, sweat in the brow. I had worked in supervisory positions for the Tribe since I was in my early 20s. I know what work is and am not afraid of it.

In example I have strived to unite our Council in the past. It’s one of the most difficult tasks. Every member of Council have their own opinion and deserve to be listened to. Not one person should be allowed to dominate a session. We are all equal in the Council Room and must be respectful of each other. If we have a conflict let’s bring them together and talk to them. Reason with them and work with them. Understanding, forgiveness and a hand shake can cement our vows for Unity. Let’s not give up on our Leaders. Let’s not give up on our People. We are entrusted with a lot of responsibility.

Do you feel it’s a fair practice for tribal council representatives to be paid if the tribal council doesn’t meet because of a lack of a quorum?   Do you think that changes need to be made to how and when tribal council members are compensated?

This issue has been debated since 1990. The People’s needs come first. It’s unfair to penalize those who work diligently through out the month and are in attendance for Council Sessions. I always believed that family emergencies take precedent. Every member of council has a Tewahe-immediate family whom he or she takes care of. It’s not the fault of those who participate and are in attendance. In the days of the month Tribal Council is charged with the responsibility of conducting Council Committee Meetings. Work is on going sometimes 24/7. A well thought out retreat and discussion should be held to address the issues of ‘Self Policing’ of Tribal Council. We are entrusted with a big responsibility and we must acknowledge that role with the best interest of the People at heart.

The People – voting members have a right to redress their grievances at the Monthly Council Sessions. If that is not allowed then the People have a right to referendum. A referendum petition of 300 signatures and election at the polls may change a policy of the Tribal Council and is Binding on the Council. If the People vote and say we shall not get paid then we should not.

In closing I appreciate all the support of the Oyate-People of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe.

I am Wiwambli- Raymond Uses The Knife Dist 5 Council Candidate 2014.

Don’t forget November 4th. Vote.

Ho he che tu yelo, Pila.

NALSA Elects Four Bear as 1L Representative 

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Jessica Four Bear

Jessica Four Bear

 

Jessica (Kennedy) Four Bear grew up on the Cheyenne River Sioux Indian Reservation in South Dakota, the daughter of Wade (Standing Rock Sioux Tribe) and Dee Ann Lawrence (Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe). Jessica’s father works for the Indian Health Service and her mother is the Higher Education Director for Cheyenne River. With her parent’s full support and promotion of higher education, Jessica is a second generation college graduate. Jessica has one daughter, Julie Ann, who is now 15 years old and also attends school in Vermillion. In 2007, Jessica married Moreau Armstrong Four Bear (Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe) who is a veteran who served ten years in the United States military and is also a member of the Fool Soldiers Society and the Elks Scraper Society.

In 2008, Jessica received her Associate of Applied Science degree in Paralegal Studies from Western Dakota Tech in Rapid City, South Dakota. Jessica completed her internship for Mario Gonzalez, a distinguished Aboriginal lawyer and activist for Indian Sovereignty. Shortly after, Jessica received her Bachelor of Science degree in Tribal Business Management from Oglala Lakota College. Throughout her higher education pursuit, Jessica worked full time for various positions for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. Her first position was Public Relations Coordinator for (formal) Tribal Chairman Harold Frazier where she was introduced to the world of politics and law. Thereafter, she worked in the Indian Child Welfare Office assisting the Director, she served two years as the Juvenile Prosecutor and later as the Lay Advocate for Game, Fish and Parks where she successfully attained a number of grants for the department.

During the summer of 2013, Jessica successfully completed the American Indian Pre-Law Summer Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico which led her here, to the University Of South Dakota School Of Law.

As the 1L representative for NALSA, Jessica has an opportunity to work with Tribes across the region and country. Jessica’s interests are in Indian Law and Indian Gaming. Jessica wants to pursue opportunities that promote Indian Country in forms of tribal economic development, self-sufficiency and strong tribal governments. Jessica believes in developing positive working relationships between the State, Tribes and Federal Government. Jessica respects the capabilities and responsibilities of each sovereign nation and fully promotes strengthening government to government relations. Jessica is also a strong advocate for the 1868 Ft. Laramie Treaty and the Black Hills and hopes to be part of the legendary negotiations one day. Jessica’s goal after law school is to join the efforts to protect Tribal sovereignty and assist Tribes in exercising their inherent powers through nation building.

Moreau Grand holds annual meeting

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MG Board 2014web

Back row left to right  Directors Barbara Begeman, Pat Aberle, Clint Clark, Royce Walker, Lois Bartlett, Robert Keckler, Kerry McLellan, Attorney John Burke.  Front Row left to right Board President Larry Hieb, Vice-president Paul Lawrence, Secretary/Treasurer Beverly Birkeland, Manager Melissa Maher, and Finance officer Linda Dahlgren.

Moreau-Grand Electric Cooperative held their 66th annual meeting in Timber Lake South Dakota on Friday, October 3, 2014. The meeting was held at the Timber Lake Public School with 168 members going through the registration line. The evening began with the Isabel United Church of Christ serving a delicious barbecued beef supper to 393 members and guests. Following the meal the third grade class of Timber Lake under the direction of Julie Barnica presented a beautiful rendition of three patriotic songs, followed by the young members drawing and movie. In the absence of ailing Board President Rod Schad Board Vice President Alan Johnson called the meeting to order at 7:00 pm. Reports were heard from Board Secretary-Treasurer Beverly Birkeland, Board Vice President Alan Johnson manager Melissa Maher, and Basin Electric Power Cooperative Senior Legislative Representative Mike Eggl. Members Gerald and Louise Pike were the recipients of this year’s Good Neighbor Award. ­­­­­­­­­Those in attendance listened to staff reports on activities in each department. These activities included construction and work schedules, demand response program, recap of system restoration efforts made since the storms of 2013, FEMA reimbursement, and the secure online bill and account access thru SmartHub. The membership elected four directors to serve on the board. District 1 Clint Clark, District 2 Barbara Begeman, District 3 Pat Aberle and District 5 Kerry McLellan. The proposed bylaw change allowing the balancing of member districts passed 65 to ­­­40. Members voiced their concerns and had questions about how pending EPA regulations are going to impact the cooperative and how capital credits are distributed. Receiving Special Recognition: Peggy Clark in honor of Director Charlie Clark for his many years of faithful service to the cooperative. Charlie passed suddenly last October. He served as a director for 8 years. Retiring Directors Rod Schad and Alan Johnson, each served the membership for 21 years. Retiring employees Pat Donavan 29 years and Rick DuFloth 28 years. Service awards were presented to: Deb Holzer – 35 years Melissa Maher – 30 years Sheila Scherer – 25 years Neil Hahne – 25 years Mary Lou Kraft – 25 years Karen Salzer – 20 years Wade Bollinger – 20 years Chad Mettler – 15 years Roger Lawien – 15 years Vender supplied door prizes were given throughout the evening with the big winners as follows: $100 prize winners were Dale & Terry McLellan, Paula Hinkley, Gary Voller, and Val Keller. 42” flat screen TV – Bobbi Jo & Grady Kraft Jayden Goldade won the young members’ prize, an Android tablet for guessing the closest to the amount of money in the jar. Following the annual meeting, the board held a reorganization meeting for the purpose of electing officers. Those selected were Larry Hieb – President, Paul Lawrence – Vice-president and Beverly Birkeland -Secretary-Treasurer. Moreau-Grand wishes to thank our members for taking time out of their busy schedules to participate in their electric cooperative business.

2014 Cheyenne-Eagle Butte Homecoming Royalty

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The 2014 Cheyenne Eagle Butte Homecoming King and Queen were crowned at the Homecoming coronation at the High School Auditorium on Monday Night. Tatum Mendoza, daughter of Rob and Delnita Mendoza, was crowned the Queen, and Micah Dupris, son of Bridget Dupris.

The 2014 Cheyenne Eagle Butte Homecoming King and Queen were crowned at the Homecoming coronation at the High School Auditorium on Monday Night. Tatum Mendoza, daughter of Rob and Delnita Mendoza, was crowned the Queen, and Micah Dupris, son of Bridget Dupris.                                                                                                               Photo by Ross DuBray

 

It’s fair time on Cheyenne River

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2014 Fair & Rodeo Schedule of Events 

Thursday

3:00 p.m. 

  • Takoja Games – (Upper Elementary Football Field)

6:00 p.m. 

  • Bike Races – (Upper Elementary Parking Lot)
  • 10 mile bike race (youth/adult)

Friday

10:00 a.m.

  • Ultimate Warrior Fitness Challenge – (Fitness Center Field)
  • 3-on-3 Basketball tournament – (C-EB High School Gym)
  • CRST Play Day – (Rodeo Grounds)

7:00 p.m. 

  • Wacipi Grand Entry – (Pow Wow Grounds)

9:00 p.m.- 2:00 a.m.

  • Felix Creek Strong Arm Contest (corner of Hwy 212 and Main St.)

Saturday

9:00 a.m.

  • Women’s Slow Pitch Softball Tournament – (Shupick Park)
  • 5K/Walk Run (adult and youth) and Kid Races (Cultural Center Parking lot)

10:00 a.m.

  • Men’s Slow Pitch Softball Tournament – (Shupick Park)
  • CRST Fitness Center 25 Mile Bike Race (registration at 9:00 a.m.)
  • Horse Races – 12 scheduled races (Rodeo Grounds)

11:00 a.m.

  • Northern Plains Horseshoe Tournament Championship (pit north of  Pow Wow Grounds)
  • Rez Dog Show (Game, Fish, and Parks parking lot.)

1:00 p.m.

  • Wacipi Grand Entry (Pow Wow Grounds)

6:00 p.m. 

  • First Rodeo performance (Rodeo Grounds)

7:00 p.m.

  • Wacipi Grand Entry (Pow Wow Grounds)

8:00 p.m.

Concert-Scatter Their Own (Cultural Center Parking Lot)

Sunday

9:00 a.m.

  • 1/2 Marathon Relay (8:00 a.m. Registration) Meet at fitness center.
  • 8th Annual Sand Classic Golf Tournament (Lakeside Golf Course)
  • Registration 8:00 a.m through 10:00 a.m.)

10:00 a.m.

  • Archery Tournament (Youth/Adult) – (GFP parking lot)
  • Men’s Slow Pitch Softball Tournament – (Shupick Park)

1:00 p.m.

  •  Grand Entry (Pow Wow Grounds)

3:00 p.m. 

  • Skateboard Competition –  (CRST Skate Park)
  • Youth Team Dance Special at the Pow Wow Grounds during supper break

6:00 p.m. 

  • Second Rodeo performance – (Rodeo Grounds)

7:00 p.m.

  • Wacipi Grand Entry –  (Pow Wow Grounds)

Monday

10:00 a.m. 

  • Parade – (Main Street)
  • Men’s Fast Pitch Softball Tournament – (Shupick Park)

12:00 p.m 

  • Punt, Pass, and Kick – (Football Field)

1:00 p.m

  • Third Rodeo Performance (Rodeo Grounds)
  • Final Wacipi Grand Entry (Pow Wow Grounds)

 

CRST Chairman Candidates Q&A

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(Editors note: the following questions were prepared by the West River Eagle along with input from community members. Every effort was made to contact all 13 candidates however only 12 responded. The candidates are listed in alphabetical order according to their last name. Our apologies to Ryman LeBeau, his Q & A didn’t appear in print.)

Joseph Brings Plenty Sr.

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

Joseph Brings Plenty Sr. I work as a Law Enforcement Officer for the CRST Law Enforcement, I enjoy working and donating my time to youth in the area. I received my Associates NSU, near complete with B.S. in Criminal Justice. I have worked in schools, as a counselor and activity coordinator. I’m married to Joni Brings Plenty, Sons Joseph Brings Plenty Jr., Cole Brings Plenty, Seth Brings Plenty, Brett Brings Plenty daughter Belle Brings Plenty. I was raised in the Eagle Butte area, and I currently live in the Community of Cherry Creek with my family.  In the past I was honored in serving as the previous Chairman of the Tribe, term: December of 2006 to December of 2010.

What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

For Lakota leadership, it’s hard to speak about self-accomplishments. I feel that although we might not all serve on elected positions, we serve as role models for our communities and people. I do live a life of Sobriety, no drugs, no alcohol, no hurting people; I practice the Lakota traditions with respect to our ancestors in mind. I’ll share a few of my endeavors. During my term I worked well with outside departments, I was able to get support when needed, with the intake water line in the Missouri, the heating fuel issues with United States Government and also supplemental funding through the country of Venezuela, meeting on many levels with the U.S. Congress and Senate and other tribes here in the U.S. But, most importantly during these meetings and events, I kept my focus on the interest and needs of the tribal members of CRST.

What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

 The biggest issue I have seen during my four-year term is that I see the tribe, being out of compliance with the Constitution. The Constitution is policy that governs our own tribal government. For example, in the CRST Constitution, it states we have 13 precincts it tells how the voting in these areas are to be conducted but our current voting is within six districts not precincts. Another example, I see how the range units are allocated out to tribal members, but in the constitution it states up to 160 acres of land to be allocated nothing more. In our own constitution it says we are incompetent when it comes to the administration of our health services and education services. Tribes that have revised their constitution have become successful and much more respondent to its member’s, also this revision would help clean up most of the confusion.

What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

My opinion is that we strive to be a self-reliant nation. With this responsibility comes the reality and upkeep of our own courts, detention centers and law enforcement personal. The historical case, Crow Dog Ex Parte pushed the Major Crimes Act upon our nations, which federally stripped our ability within our own nation to oversee those crimes listed in the Act itself, since then Indian Nations have been on the defense when it comes to outside entities coming onto our lands and pressing their acts and laws upon us. We have a signed Treaty with the United States Government; this Treaty is deemed to be higher than federal law in itself. Now the people of this tribe have the ultimate power, in the ability to vote, if the tribal members of CRST want to give away what they are entitled to, then let them do so in a vote.

Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

The pipeline traffic is only the beginning to future outside interest in our resources and area. Many Indian Nations have been and will continuously deal with this issue. Do we have the ability to create strong laws in order to protect Indian people and Indian interest? Treaty and Government Law says we do. We are only as strong as our laws that govern us as a nation. I’ve seen the Iroquois Nation create their own passports and that is their rights, they are a sovereign nation, such as us. I’ve come to the understanding the tribe will face Fracking interests right here on our own lands, if this is done, it will cause great harm to the Mni waconi, our water supplies. If we can’t protect ourselves with our own law, I fear the worst in the safety and lives of our tribal members. Water is life.

Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

This question could be addressed through the constitutional revision process. Council Representatives duties are not defined in the constitution, which doesn’t protect them from dealing with personnel issues, although there is a resolution that does not allow personal issues on council floor, it has happened in the past. Council Representatives are Legislatures; the duties of administrating should be carried by the executive branch of our government which is the Chairman’s office. We would assume this, but those duties are not listed in the Constitution, those powers are given to the Chairman by resolution passed by Tribal Council, if council feels the need to strip the Chairman of those powers, it could happen in the raise of a hand and a vote to support.  I reiterate, Constitutional Revision would assist with departments and how they function, help with the employees on down the line to the members they are serving.

With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

Issues of funding cuts in Indian Country have existed since President Reagan’s term in office, with a huge cut of 75% during that time. Since then we have been cut yearly, and have to find other ways of supplementing our school dollars and assisting with health care issues, amongst other areas of need with in our tribe. One thing we have to keep mind, is that when we hear the term, new funding, I’ve learned that funding come from the Government isn’t technically new funding, its funding usually cut from another source of funding. We would have to meet with key personal in the White House to address these new issues we would be facing. This wouldn’t be an easy task but if the concern of the Tribe isn’t heard on a congressional and senate level, we may not be able to correct these new issues.

 Amos Cook

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

My name is Amos Cook. My Indian name is Tasunke Sapa, which means Black Horse in English. I am from the Takini Community on the west end of the reservation.

Past leadership roles I have held are working with the youth and the elderly. I ride every year with youth at risk, children of single parents, and take them up to the Big Horn to teach them culture, leadership, language, history, horseman ship and spirituality. I basically teach them how to deal with modern day problems. It works, I have been doing this for 6 years.

I am traditional person. I believe in cultural ways, seven values, Sundance and the sweat lodge.

I have worked a lot with the elderly, gaining knowledge from them and passing it on to the kids, and it helps me and the kids dealing with the problems of today’s society such drug abuse and alcohol abuse, neglect and peer pressure. I teach kids how to deal with negativity.

I have three beautiful boys, I have raised them with my wife to be role models for children who do not have both parents. They have compassion for children without fathers and mothers, and that is what I try to teach them.

What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

I believe in truth and honesty. I believe in unity. I am a very spiritual person, and I believe in spirituality. I am a full-blooded Lakota. I have a lot of ideas that I can put to use, but they have to be with the people, because the decisions are theirs.

I have ideas that we can use to create employment by developing natural resources using wind towers, green houses, solar energy and log homes.

The power is in the people. If I am elected as chairmen, I can’t and won’t move forward unless the people are together. I believe that the youth are important, as well as the elderly and everyone in between. Everybody in our tribe is important, and we all move forward together. We need to bring back unity.

What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

Unemployment is the number one issue here. We have 99 percent unemployment on this reservation. I want to bring employment by using natural resources and bringing that kind of business to the reservation. I need the people to help too. I can’t do this by myself. I need the people.

What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

I believe as tribal members, we can take care of our own. I always believed in the way our ancestors lived by. Some of their ways were strong, and kept our people strong, healthy and alive. I know we can create our own law enforcement, and we can protect and provide for our people.

Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

I think we have tried to stop that traffic, but they somehow keep going through, so I think we need to focus on where it is being sent to, but if we can’t stop it, we need to re-route it. We need to keep the pipeline, and its traffic off of our land because of the damage it could cause in the future.

Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

When it comes to that matter, we should follow protocol or procedure and act professionally to deal with the different situations. If we do not have something in place, then we need to develop something so that personal feelings are not brought to the work site. We need to act professionally, and both employers and employees need to keep their relationships professional, and not bring personal matters into the workplace.

With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

This will all go back to the natural resources that we use. It’s all about being sovereign. It’s all over the news and everywhere that we are sovereign, so I feel in my heart we should practice being sovereign. By using natural resources, we can generate funds, or be able to put funds back into a general fund for health care and education. I think the only way we are going to move forward is to make that change – to become a unified, sovereign nation.

Wayne L. Ducheneaux, II

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)
My name is Wayne L. Ducheneaux, II. I am the second youngest of 7 children born to Regina and the late Wayne Ducheneaux. I currently reside in Eagle Butte. My leadership roles have included running a Tribal Enterprise, the Cheyenne River Motel, serving for two years as the Administrative Officer of the Tribe, sitting as the Chairman and Vice-Chairman for several Council Committees, serving as a member of the Direct Service Tribes Advisory Council to the I.H.S. Director and I am currently the CRST Vice-Chairman.

What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

I feel my experience as a successful manager of a Tribal business, Administrative Officer, Council Representative and Vice-Chairman qualify me as being a good leader for the Tribe. I’ve been on every side of Tribal government and that helps me to see a complete picture on how we should operate. I feel the primary quality that makes me a good leader is having a good work ethic. I truly believe a Chairman’s day isn’t over at 5 pm and doesn’t begin at 8 am. You must be willing to be there early and stay late to set an example for the rest of the administration. Another quality I feel makes me a good leader is the ability to listen. No one person can be an expert at everything and being able to listen and take advice helps a person grow and make the best decisions possible.

What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

To list one issue as a priority is difficult but for the sake of providing an answer to the question I would say it’s still our water project. Not being able to provide the potable water needed for our Tribe to expand has stifled our growth physically, economically and causes the exacerbation of many other issues. No water has meant housing continues to be a problem and as we crowd into our current homes that pressures increase other issues. No water has meant the inability to build for new economic development. We are having to look at existing structures to bring in business because of the lack of water to develop new areas. As Chairman I will continue to push for the complete funding of the Mni Waste water project that will bring potable water to the entire Reservation so we can further address other issues facing the Tribe.

What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

I am not in favor of cross-deputization with city, county or state officials. We have the inherent sovereignty and responsibility to provide for a judicial system within our exterior boundaries that keep all residents of the Reservation safe. Rather than looking outside to other law enforcement to assist, I believe our Tribe has the capacity to expand our current jurisdiction. I would like to move to model our judicial system after other Tribal nations that would allow us the ability to enforce all law on the reservation and have our courts be the court of competent jurisdiction for members and non-members alike.

Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

Oil development is something we are going have to deal with for the foreseeable future. As a Tribal government we have stood against it as we feel the costs of development far outweigh any benefit gained. To ensure the proper safety for our Reservation we need to complete and implement the changes we are already working on to further develop our Traffic Code. These changes will give our Law Enforcement the further authority needed to ensure that public safety is upheld. It will also allow for us to hold the state and trucking companies accountable for routing improper cargo within our jurisdiction.

Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

As a Tribal Council absolutely not. Personnel matters are matters for the administration of the Tribe to deal with. As legislators if people are being treated unfairly the job is to shape policy to ensure the fair and equal treatment of all employees is a fundamental right. However as a candidate for Chairman it is the duty, according to policy, for the Chairman’s administration to handle such matters. If elected Chairman I would work to implement the policy set by the Council, work with them to change things that are not working and defend the rights of Tribal employees so that they can put forth their best effort doing the peoples work.

With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

The first thing we must do is continue with our alliances nationally to push back against these funding cuts. The federal government, nearly across the board is cutting base funding and moving toward competitive grant funding for Indian related programs. This is a complete 180 from their obligation to the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe through our treaty rights. If elected I will work to educate and inform Congress on these obligations and help to show them that increasing base funding to Indian programs is the only way to fulfill these obligations. We must use comprehensive and strategic planning to shape the minds of the Congress and reverse this damaging path we heading down now.

Ronald Eagle Chasing

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

Ronald Eagle Chasing, Mni Koju, I come from the Chief Hump and Crazy Horse Clan. I live in Eagle Butte.

What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

I’m a Vietnam Veteran.

What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

 People have the power, not the council.

What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

Negotiate

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

We need to negotiate with Washington D.C.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

No. No more nepotism. Let those in charge do their jobs.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

Changes need to be made.

 Thomas Ray Eagle Staff

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

I am Thomas Ray Eagle Staff (My Lala named me “Wanbli Wapaha”). I am married to Etheleen (Eddie) Jewett and together, we have 6 sons, 2 daughters, and 12 grandchildren. We live East of Whitehorse and thoroughly enjoy the “country” or rural living; smell of grass, sage, clover, wildlife, etc. Past leadership roles include being the Chairman and Co-chairman of a National planning committee for Youth Regional Treatment Centers. This committee developed an ‘outcome measuring program’ that was designed to illustrate progress and/or the success of individuals in alcohol and substance abuse treatment. Our Committee received a National Achievement Award from HHS-IHS and SAMHSA for the development of this program and I received an individual award for leadership.

What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

One of the primary duties of the Chairman is to manage the Real Property and Financial and Human resources for the Tribe; I have over 30-years of work experience in management and administration. This includes managing two different urban non-profit Indian Organizations, administrative experience from employment with the CRST and a 28-year career with Indian Health Service that included health facilities planning and being the administrator for two youth regional treatment centers. During my IHS career I utilized data and data analysis to aid with planning and management. These same strategic planning methodologies could be applied to Tribal Programs to enhance their services and/or performances and provide data to measure, illustrate, and adjust services as data indicates. Assess and make data driven decisions to implement change.

 What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

The unemployment rate (47% Tribal Ventures Report); this issue affects the quality of life for members, deters progress, and revenue generating opportunities for small businesses and the Tribe. As the new Chairman, I would assess the Tribe’s economic development plan, encourage small business development through the partnerships with Tribal Ventures and Four Bands, and encourage the Tribe’s planning department to seek business perspectives with enterprises that would employ large numbers of employees.

 What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

I do not support cross-deputizing State or County law enforcement officers as it would jeopardize the Tribe’s Sovereignty. The Tribal/BIA Police Officers are able respond to assist the State or County Officers with law enforcement situations involving Tribal members.

I would favor cross-deputizing “our” Tribal/BIA Police Officers. This action would make their job easier to enforce the applicable set of laws and be more responsive to all law enforcement issues. Especially, when the safety of our Tribal members is in question as in a domestic abuse/violence situation; a lot of “wait-time” is expended waiting for the appropriate law enforcement officer to arrive to address the Non-Indian violator.

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

Definitely. There is too much ambiguity in the Tribal Council Resolution intended to assist the Tribal/BIA Police Officers.

A Tribal Traffic Code regulating truck traffic in the same manner as the Department of Transportation could also be a possible revenue source to hire more law enforcement officers. A well developed code would require Tribal Permits to cross the Reservation (similar to TERO), provide authority to regulate weight limits, check log books, inspect loads, provide for portable scales to monitor and prevent weight limit abuses, etc.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

The Tribe should allow the human resource management plan and/or the personnel policy and procedures work for them. The Tribe identifies a financial and human resource management plan as part of each contract and grant application the Tribe manages. These plans/policies and procedures need to be adhered to for the continuation of these funding streams and services. Anytime these plans and/or policies and procedures are not followed; questioned or disallowed costs are identified during the audits of these grants and contracts. Such findings could be detrimental to any organization as the funding source asks for compensation for the disallowed costs or decreases future funding as a result.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

I would simply work with each entity and “Assess and adjust.” Two key questions would be; “are we optimizing each and every reimbursement opportunity for services provided?” And, have we sought accreditation and/or maintained accreditation for reimbursement purposes?”

Despite the ‘wolf cries’ of certain U.S. Senators and Congressmen, Medicare/Medicaid will always be available as a means to supplement healthcare operations. Maximizing reimbursement opportunities in healthcare has always been a key factor in determining the feasibility of healthcare. Look at how many healthcare clinics there are in Eagle Butte.

For education, the student reimbursement rate needs to be assessed and if needed, work toward adjusting rates to similar levels of the Department of Defense Education System and/or Impact Aid reimbursement levels.

Assess your data and adjust. Then lobby Congress as needed.

 Harold Frazier

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

My name is Harold Frazier, I live in White Horse SD with my family girlfriend Annette, daughter Mariah, sons Jake and Noah and grandson Dylan. I was Chairman of CRST in 2002-2006, Tribal Councilman 1998-2002 and Chairman of the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen Assoc. Area and Vice-President of NCAI.

 What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

BS Degree in Business Administration

AA degree in General Business and AAS in Ag Business

Past Chairman and Administrator of CRST. Field Supervisor for Cheyenne River Gas & CATV

I live and practice our Traditional Ways. Understand well and speak a little of our Lakota language.

 What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

There are many issues that affect our people. One of them is high unemployment. I would encourage education for our people. Develop a work program utilizing JTAC to build a work force and bring in industry so our people can have jobs and work.

 What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

I believe strongly in Law & Order but we need to be cautious in entering in any agreement with outside jurisdictions so we do not give any of our sovereignty and jurisdiction.

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

Yes, we do need to have a strong Traffic Code to address the traffic, particularly dealing with heavy trucks. We need scales set up so we could weigh and take measures to stop these overweight trucks from ruining our roads.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

NO, elected officials shouldn’t be involved with personnel matters. Only the Administration should be involved.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

I would lobby Congress for more funding and to stop the proposed cuts. I have done this before during my last term in office and was quite successful.

 William Carl High Bear Sr.

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

William Carl High Bear Sr. I Live in Dupree. Spouse Lindell High Bear. I have five children.

 What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

I have some education. Held several positions with tribe. I’m very consistent in working and serving my family. I would do the same for the CRST.

 What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

Our youth and elders are being left out of in-town opportunities.

 What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

None what so ever, it would be up to the people of CRST.

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

It would take a more developed traffic code by CRST.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

No, leave it up to Human Resources and the policy group to handle personnel issues.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

Take actions or respond to government officials to not cut our Health and Education. These areas are much needed for our people.

 Bryce In The Woods

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

Le Wakinyan Cikala Lakol caje bluha yelo. Ate na Ina mitawa Lakota woglakapi na waniyetu ota Unci/Ina Maka akan ni pelo. I am Bryce In The Woods my Lakota name is Wakinyan Ciikala. My parents are Jobe and Ellen In The Woods who speak our Lakota language and have lived on our Grandmother/Mother Earth for many winters. My brothers are Bernard, Burton, Bentley, Barney, Byron and my sisters Beverly, Bessie, Bernita, and Belinda. I have three siblings that passed away Barbara, Bobby and Blaine. My significant other and life partner Candace Lee has been by my side for 13 years. I live in the community of Dupree and in the house where my Father passed into the spirit world. I was on the city council of Dupree and once made a recommendation on flagpoles. I have been the Recording Secretary since 1999 of the Naca Okolakiciye name change in 2001 to the Lakota Elders Council, National Vice-Commander of the National American Indian Veterans, Inc, CRST Wolakota and Veterans Affairs Chairman for eight years, Black Hills Advisory Board 2002-2005, No Child Left Behind Advisory Board 2010, Wakpa Sica Judicial Committee, United Native Nations member, Tetonwan Oyate Treaty Council and Black Hills Treaty Council since 1996, two-term CRST District 1 Council Representative, District 1 Community Development Cooperative President, US Army veteran.

 What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

The experiences I have as a Treaty Council Representative and a two-term Tribal Council Representative. I have some college, was a certified Alcohol/Drug counselor, currently a Community Health Representative, and past military service. I gained experience working with the Youth with the Healthy Nations program and the Elders through the Lakota Elders Council. I have worked with professionals; Tribal and US elected officials and experienced Indigenous peoples throughout this journey. I have done Hanbleciya and Wiwangya Wacipi Rites with the Canumpa that I gained much universal knowledge through our Creator. This has sustained our Lakota People through good times and times of tribulations. I have my legislative accomplishments on Facebook for 2000-2004 check it out. Briefly our People invested in me and I feel I owe an obligation to give my best for the People. My goal is to end poverty on this reservation.

 What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

It is one of a socio-economic nature. The statistics that even the White House puts out on poverty, suicide, violence, it is negativity against our People. I have heard the White House report at the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in March 2012. The CRST and the Peta/Oceti Sakowin have a vast resource that we have been unable to tap into to address our economy. WE get the resources that our rightfully ours we can start the process in changing are social structure with jobs, food on the table, good winter outfits and shelter from harsh elements. I have been working on addressing poverty and have two solid plans that our PEOPLE need to review. It will be the PEOPLE that will change our situation on poverty not elected officials.

 What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

I would oppose cross-deputization with the state unless our PEOPLE confirm this would be what they want or desire. The Chairman’s position is as an Eyapaha for the people and must protect the sovereignty and jurisdiction of the PEOPLE. The People are the true sovereignty bearers. A question to the PEOPLE protect which sovereignty and jurisdiction the CRST or the Peta/Oceti Sakowin?

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

There is a draft traffic code that an ex-police officer brought in and I don’t know the status of this proposed legislation. I believe we must have a forward-looking traffic code now to protect our environment and most importantly our people. This again is a sovereignty and jurisdiction issue. The CRST can weigh and fine these heavy hauls as one option instead of them passing by uncontested. The TransCanada representatives with State Department officials present never answered the question on “How TransCanada will deal with earthquakes?”I was on the conference call in 2012 this is an important question that needs to be answered.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

If the question is should elected officials micro-manage? No they shouldn’t there is a Code of Ethics that was passed in 2005. Elected Officials should be developing policy and laws to strengthen the services provided to our people and protecting our sovereignty and jurisdiction. The Chairman does have some delegated authorities through a 1978 resolution, the CRST Constitution and by-laws and tribal law, specifically the CRST Personnel Policy and Procedure Manual.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

The key is for a united front to pursue the changing funding cycles. A Great Plains front of united elected officials and our People that are working in these fields. We get a lot of lip service from federal officials but to be effective is to get to the right people the President, the Office of Management and Budget and congressional appropriation committee Chairs and their key staff. We have to know our History because we are the Creditors not the Debtors. Briefly I am completing this at the 11th hour before press. Unity amongst ourselves is the KEY!

 Manny C. Iron Hawk

Background (family: community you live in: past leadership roles)

My name is Manny C. Iron Hawk, Si Thanka/Maspegnaka Thiospaye, my immediate family consists of Hasani Renee Iron Hawk, Chunksi, Michon and Claudia. We reside in Frazier/Red Scaffold west side of Wakpa Waste (Cheyenne River). I have been in Education for 25 plus years, started as a Bus driver/custodian, paraprofessional to obtaining a Master’s degree in administration. My leadership roles consist of: being a spokesperson for my thiospaye, educational leadership role in PK-12 school, District 2 chairperson at various times, served on the Sioux YMCA board, CRST Police Commission, Little Bighorn advisory board, served as a Takini school board member, CRST Pte Hcaka board, CRST Housing Authority board, CRST Telephone Authority board, Farm Service Agency Board member for Ziebach County, and on the Tri-Community Development board.

 What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for CRST?

My qualifications include completing a Master’s degree, Effective communication is the “KEY” including good listening skills, leadership is power WITH people, Model the way, “Come, Follow Me”, Inspire a shared Vision in areas of need, example Poverty and Unemployment. Challenge the Process of doing right than being right. Encourage others to Act assist and create conditions that release their human potential. Lastly, Encourage the Heart with positive messages. Following Lakota Values/Virtues of bravery, fortitude, generosity and holding the people in your heart.

 What do you think is the number one issue the CRST faces and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

There are many issues on Cheyenne River infrastructure (roads), unemployment, poverty, education, lack of created jobs, inflation on the reservation, sovereignty, but the main issue I would address is education. We need to remap our education system to a world-class education system where our students can compete globally anywhere.

 What is your stance on cross deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

I believe it can work providing agreements are followed through on arrests made. The agreements need to be specific and a plan in place for any situation.

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

Yes, on top of our issue challenges, we need a strong code that will deter the traffic and level fines when violated.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

No, that is why we have a grievance policy procedure and the tribal courts. If it doesn’t work we need to replace it with one that will work.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

If we are a true sovereign nation and a “Treaty Tribe” we deserve the best in health care and education. I believe upholding our treaty rights is the key, and in administrating funds we need to stay within our budget limitations. Lobbying is a must, in Washington, DC with senators and congressional officials. I would do my utmost with other tribal leaders to lobby for continued improved health care and educational funding a top priority.

 Lanny W. LaPlante, Jr.

Name and background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

Lanny W. LaPlante, Jr. I was born in Eagle Butte, in 1971. Mother, Irma LaPlante, retired CEB Kindergarten Teacher. Father, Lanny LaPlante, Sr. former CRST tribal councilman/chairman. Graduate of Takini High School, 1990. Enlisted in US Marine Corp 1992, honorably discharged in 2006.2007-2008 Residential/Commercial construction, Boston,MA.

2009-2010 CRST Police Officer. 2010-present Advisor to US Government. 2007-present Airport Construction. 2013 University of Massachusetts at Boston, student.

 What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

My qualifications for leadership stem from my 14 years of experience as a Marine/Force Reconnaissance Marine. I have had the lives of not only Marines, but also US Government personal entrusted to my care. In the private sector I am an advisor to the, US Government in high threat areas. I own my own company and have built airports from San Diego CA to Orlando FL. I have construction knowledge with state and Federal Government/FAA. Integrity and compassion for my people. I believe in transparency in government and balance of power. I believe in the civil rights of tribal members and the responsibility of those elected to respond to the issues of the people by whom they are elected.

 What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?.

Corruption. And the lack of transparency in our government, For example, the Veterans’ building in the No Heart Community was never completed. For the excavation cost alone, $250,000 was paid from the funds gifted Work that should have cost $15,000. The end result was the building which was meant to honor our veterans, many of which, who were still fighting on foreign soil, was never completed.

Buffalo Program, 3 million dollars is unaccounted for, instead of demanding for accountability our council spent millions more covering up the mismanagement, no questions asked. I plan to audit all programs and to give quarterly reports to the public.

 What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

In no way do I support the idea of cross deputization. Our reservation is on trust land and protected by federal government laws. Tribal sovereignty is of the utmost importance. Updating our codes will assist our leaders in strengthening courts and tribal police officers for the future. Our police officers will get the best training and resources to do their job safely. As a community, we need to support our tribal officers. We shall establish CRST as the forerunner for all police departments to emulate.

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

Yes, I believe the issue is sovereignty. We as a tribe, have the right, to protect and preserve our sovereign nation. As US citizens, we have the right, under the constitution to peacefully assemble and protest any and all intrusion that undermines the safety and well being of our lands and or people. Updating our tribal constitution, by the people to strengthen all aspects of our sovereignty, including our right to protect our environment is essential to the health and future of our nation.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

No, this has been a common trend among our people. It has hurt us as a tribe, We have tribal members who do not have qualifications, experience or training running programs. This has had a crippling affect on our tribe and its’ ability to evolve. We as a tribe need to take family politics out of our work environment and operate with true professionalism as a people.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

Improving our tribal economy is the only solution to maintaining our sovereignty, language, culture and improving our educational goals. We are the first educators of our children, preparing them to compete in a global economy requires us to instill all the unique strengths that come from our culture and history. Through education and cultural awareness, we as a people, must adapt healthier lifestyle. Through our grass roots economic plan, raising food with integrity, buying local and becoming more self sustaining we can better manage our preventable health issues, reducing the demand on Federal funds.

Ryman LeBeau

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

My name is Ryman LeBeau. My wife Lesli and are the parents of four children three boys and one girl.

I have had various leadership roles in the past. From my past leadership roles, I am proud of being promoted to “Project Coordinator” AI Program, when I worked for Native American Fish & Wildlife Society. Also, in December 2008 being elected to Council and Reelected in 2012 to Council by District 5.

 What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

My qualifications and qualities for a good leader are as follows:

December 2003 graduated from Haskell Indian Nations University

January 2004 hired as a Biologist for the Native American Fish & Wildlife Society

July 2006 Promoted to “Project Coordinator” A.I. Program for the Native American Fish & Wildlife Society

December 2012 Re-Elected to Tribal Council from District 5

 What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

The number one issue for the Tribe is drinking water for all the citizens. Since I’ve been on Tribal Council we all have been working on getting drinking water to all the communities throughout the rez. With the groundbreaking of the new water line, we are halfway in accomplishing this goal. We need to continue to lobby for funds and continue to work with our partners at the DC level, USDA, BIA, IHS and private sector. Water is life. With drinking water available throughout the rez would mean new housing and new businesses – growth.

 What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

We need to always protect the sovereign rights of our tribe and the sovereign rights of our citizens before any cross deputation.

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

Yes it does warrant more developed traffic code. Also in the Environment committee, which I chair, we are working to update and upgrade our Environmental protection laws against illegal spilling, down stream.pollution and other ways to protect our lands.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

No. Elected officials have a role and should respect the Tribes separation of Administration and Legislation.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

We need to educate Congress not only the SD Senators and Congresswoman but all the key players in Congress, on their trust responsibility that they have to fully fund Health and Education for our Tribe.

Robert “Bob” Walters

Background (family; community you live in; past leadership roles)

Mitakuyapi, Tatanka Luta miye yelo. My name is Robert Walters but most people know me as Bob. I am the son of the late Joe Walters and Betty Walters and the grandson of Willard H and Amy (Arpan) Walters. I grew up at Promise and attended School at White Horse, Promise and Graduated from Timber Lake High School. I attended Lake Area Vo Tech and graduated with my degree in Carpentry. I married Kathy in 1984; we have 3 children Brice, Willard and Connie Jo they have all graduated from C-EB. We have also been blessed with one granddaughter Wokini Mae.

I have worked at various places through the years from cutting meat at Butlers Jack and Jill, driving the CRST Propane truck and becoming an Inspector for Housing Authority. I left Housing 12 years ago when I was first elected to Tribal Council and have had the honor to serve the people. During my time on council I have served as Vice Chairman and have been on many committees including the Missouri River Implementation Recovery Committee.

 What qualifications and qualities do you possess that would make you a good leader for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe?

I believe first of all that I am honest and fair, I understand that there are always two sides to every situation and I believe that both sides be known before decisions are made. I am strong; I stand my ground when fighting for our water other important issues and believe that strength could be used to Lobby at the State and Federal Governments as your Chairman. While on Tribal Council I held the position of Vice Chairman, I know the people and the structure and functions of the Tribal departments and businesses, there wouldn’t be a learning period we the Tribal Council and Administration could go straight to work for the people of Cheyenne River.

 What do you think is the number one issue the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe faces, and if elected what would you do to address and change it?

There are several issues from health care to housing. But I feel that the number one issue is our water issue because without water there is no life. The oil pipe line is right up there too, because it threatens our water and the land.

 What is your stance on cross-deputization with state or county law enforcement officers?

Absolutely NOT!!!

 Does the recent oil pipeline traffic through the reservation warrant a more developed traffic code or policy on how to handle this traffic?

Our Council has already taken action by resolution not allowing the Oil pipeline trucks to come through the reservation. To me that is the stand of the Tribal government, therefore it should be respected by the outside entities.

 Should elected officials involve themselves in personnel matters pertaining to tribal employees?

No, I do not believe that they should involve themselves. Although I do believe we should listen to the employee and direct them to follow protocol and as elected officials we should make sure that the employees rights are respected and that they are treated fairly.

 With the federal government cutting budgets in Indian Country for health care and education, if elected, what steps would your administration take to address this funding shortfall?

I have and always will remind IHS and the powers that be that Health Care and Education are Treaty Rights and that they cannot take them away from us.

Youth Horsemanship Project gets funding for much needed boots

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The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe was awarded a three-year Department of Justice grant to establish a Youth Horsemanship Project. The grant provides free horse-care instruction to area youth, but organizers found they were unable to spend any of the funds on gear for individual youth participants.

This has caused a problem for the aspiring horsemen. “We found a lot of the parents don’t have the means to purchase boots and good riding boots are very expensive,” said Juanita McLane, Youth Horsemanship Assistant.  “Unfortunately, we weren’t able to use any of the grant money for personal wear.”

Sturdy boots are essential when working with horses. “The footwear is more a safety issue, so their feet won’t slip through the stirrup,” said Dennis Rousseau, Director of Game, Fish and Parks,  the program that administers the grant.

For more of this story look at our August 7th issue!

Dupree City Council discusses the need for pre-planning and following established procedures

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ust 4 at 7:00 p.m. for a long and discussion-filled evening including extensive discussion concerning situations in which procedures were not followed as they should have been and hindsight took the place of foresight.

Larry Reede and Jim Veit attended the meeting to address a bill the council brought into question at the last meeting pertaining to running sewage and water lines to Reede’s property.

The bill, which was sent to the council to pay the city’s portion of the installation, was questioned because the council did not officially approve the procedure and the amount it would cost, but individuals on the council gave verbal approval and Reede and Veit completed and submitted all of the proper paperwork necessary prior to doing the work.

Stambach awarded Anna L. Rowe Scholarship at SDSU

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as awarded the Anna L. Rowe Scholarship in Education and Human Sciences for the 2014-2015 academic year at South Dakota State University. She will be recognized at the College of Education and Human Sciences’ scholarship banquet held Sept. 6 in the Volstorff Ballroom at SDSU’s University Student Union.

Stambach is a sophomore majoring in early childhood education at SDSU where she is active in State-A-Thon, intramural volleyball and the Fishback Early Childhood Center. She is the daughter of Mark and Monica Stambach and is a 2013 graduate of Dupree High School.

For more of this story look at our August 7th issue!

In The Woods selected to UTTC Legends Diamond Hall of Fame

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DSC_0614-Bernita-In-the-Woods-hall-of-famer

 

 

Bernita In The Woods, from the Dupree area and a member of the Cheyenne-River Sioux Tribe

has been selected as a member of the Inaugural Class of the Diamond Legends Softball Tournament Hall of Fame to be held on Saturday, September 6, 2014.

Her recognition comes in light of her “outstanding play in the United Tribes Softball Tournament” according to the United Tribes Technical College President Phil Baird and UT Softball Chairman Steve Shepherd.

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